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Thought Experiments: Prisoners Dilemma, Quantum Suicide and Immortality, Thought Experiment, Newcombs Paradox, Quasi-Empirical Method Source Wikipedia

Thought Experiments: Prisoners Dilemma, Quantum Suicide and Immortality, Thought Experiment, Newcombs Paradox, Quasi-Empirical Method

Source Wikipedia

Published September 4th 2011
ISBN : 9781156795996
Paperback
38 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 36. Chapters: Prisoners dilemma, Quantum suicide and immortality, Thought experiment, Newcombs paradox,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 36. Chapters: Prisoners dilemma, Quantum suicide and immortality, Thought experiment, Newcombs paradox, Quasi-empirical method, Infinite monkey theorem, Coherence, Simulated reality, Pascals Wager, Retrocausality, Laplaces demon, The Lady, or the Tiger?, Levinthals paradox, Kavkas toxin puzzle, Exotheology, Martian scientist, Changing places, Sphere-world. Excerpt: Simulated reality is the proposition that reality could be simulated-perhaps by computer simulation-to a degree indistinguishable from true reality. It could contain conscious minds which may or may not be fully aware that they are living inside a simulation. This is quite different from the current, technologically achievable concept of virtual reality. Virtual reality is easily distinguished from the experience of actuality- participants are never in doubt about the nature of what they experience. Simulated reality, by contrast, would be hard or impossible to separate from true reality. There has been much debate over this topic, ranging from philosophical discourse to practical applications in computing. In brain-computer interface simulations, each participant enters from outside, directly connecting their brain to the simulation computer. The computer transmits sensory data to the participant, reads and responds to their desires and actions in return- in this manner they interact with the simulated world and receive feedback from it. The participant may be induced by any number of possible means to forget, temporarily or otherwise, that they are inside a virtual realm (e.g. passing through the veil, a term borrowed from Christian tradition, which describes the passage of a soul from an earthly body to an afterlife). While inside the simulation, the participants consciousness is represented by an avatar, which can look very different from the participa...